Conservation Sense and Nonsense

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

To Sarah V regarding the use of herbicides to eradicate non-native plants. As a native plant advocate, you are probably familiar with Daniel Simberloff, the academic ecologist who is a strong supporter of invasion biology. Simberloff was the keynote speaker at the most recent conference o…

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

In response to Sarah V: The birds are unlikely to have benefited from the removal of honeysuckle. Please read this study: Amanda D. Rodewald, et. al., “Does removal of invasives restore ecological networks? An experimental approach,” Biological Invasions, March 2015

The hypothesis o…

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

In response to Carolyn's concern about garlic mustard: Here are three scientific studies about garlic mustard that are summarized by the lead author: “In six years of study, we have not been able to document any substantial effects by garlic mustard on other plant species, positive or neg…

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

In response to Carolyn’s botanist friend, who says, “And invasive-infested ecosystems are not likely to give way to native plant succession without management (i.e., herbicides).”

Herbicides are the most frequently used method of killing non-native plants, but using herbicides does …

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

In reply to Carolyn: Here are three scientific studies about garlic mustard that are summarized by the lead author: “In six years of study, we have not been able to document any substantial effects by garlic mustard on other plant species, positive or negative. In fact, the best predictor…

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

Thanks to JRD for asking for studies that document the value of non-native plants to wildlife. Here are a few:

• Arthur M. Shapiro, “Exotics as host plants of the California butterfly fauna,” Biological Conservation, 110, 413-433, 2003. Based on 40 years of walking his research plot…

Conservation Sense and Nonsense

Thanks to the Bay Journal for publishing this excellent article about non-native plants that are capable of tolerating the changes human activities have made in nature. The success of non-native plants is a symptom of changes in the environment, not the cause. As this article explains, no…