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903 articles found for: susquehanna river

New National Heritage Area to highlight Susquehanna (Cover Story/May 2019)
The majestic Lower Susquehanna River, its vistas, wooded hills, sculpted potholes — in the river rocks, not roads — and its place in shaping U.S. history will get more attention now that it has earned a seat among the nation’s other 54 national heritage areas. The Susquehanna National Heritage Area was recently created by Congress and President Donald Trump, after 11...
Exelon agrees to $200 million settlement for impact of Conowingo Dam (Article/October 2019)
The owner of Conowingo Dam has struck a deal with Maryland to resolve a dispute over the hydropower facility’s role in polluting the Chesapeake Bay and how much, if any, it should be required to pay to help with the cleanup. In a settlement announced Tuesday, Exelon Generation Co. has agreed to spend more than $200 million over the next 50 years on projects intended to...
This river rocks! (Bay Journeys Article/September 2013)
When Ranae Tibbens angles her blue kayak through the broad waters of the lower Susquehanna River, rocks are strewn across her path. Quite often, she aims right for them. Tibbens, a professional river guide, is in the midst of a self-confessed love affair — with rocks. And the lower Susquehanna River is a great place to be. Below the city and suburbs of Harrisburg, PA,...
Geology and history recorded in Susquehanna rocks (Bay Journeys Article/September 2015)
Jeri Jones stood on a hill a couple of hundred feet above the Susquehanna River and explained how, at one time, he would have been underwater at this very spot. “Imagine the river was at least as high as those hills that you see right there,” he said, pointing to hills across the river that overshadowed Safe Harbor Dam and rose above the hill where he stood in Apollo...
Turkey Hill Trail stuffed with views of Susquehanna, birds (Bay Journeys Article/October 2019)
Where can you find the largest pawpaw patch north of Maryland, trace an old railroad bed along the Susquehanna River, hear the swoosh of wind turbines and meander through vast flowering meadows? And where, on the same hike, can you get a bird’s-eye view of one of the most important migratory stops for shorebirds and take in two killer views of the Susquehanna at its widest...
Susquehanna River, while stressed, is certainly no cesspool (Forum/June 2005)
Given my position with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, it comes as no surprise that people are asking for my reaction to the recent American Rivers report declaring the Susquehanna River the nation’s number one endangered river. Many people are concerned by American Rivers’ characterization of the Susquehanna River as a cesspool, while others have embraced it...
Rare Chesapeake logperch get first release into Lower Susquehanna stream (Article/September 2019)
Just a few miles from where they were first discovered in 1842, about 100 globally rare Chesapeake logperch, raised in captivity, were released with great fanfare Sept. 27 into a tributary of the Susquehanna River in Lancaster County, PA. A phalanx of government officials and members of conservation groups, all holding cameras, stood by in waders and rolled-up pants as the...
Richmond by raft delivers adventures on the James (Bay Journeys Article/March 2016)
“This is not an oar. It’s a paddle, and you are going to be the power for our rafts,” Dave Fary of Richmond Outfitters told a small group of rafters, dressed to get wet on a September morning. They stood under a railroad trestle along the James River in Richmond. At 10 a.m., it was already 85 degrees. The day would be a hot one....
Past keeps cropping up along remote York River Water Trail (Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network/June 2003)
At a Native American village along the banks of the York River nearly 400 years ago, an Englishman was brought before Chief Powhatan, leader of 30 local tribes, to face judgment. He was accused of the brutal murder of several Indians along the Rappahannock River, a charge that would have brought death. Then, according to legend, Powhatan’s daughter, Pocahontas, intervened...
Toxics, long-ignored, once again on cleanup radar (Cover Story/November 2018)
Fred Pinkney went fishing this fall on the Anacostia River, but fish weren’t the real quarry. One drippy morning in October, Pinkney and his helper, Tanner Stoker, seined the shallows off a sandbar near Bladensburg, MD. Then they boated downriver into the District of Columbia and put wire mesh traps in a cove near the site of a demolished Pepco power plant. They baited the...
PA fish official battles other agencies over status of Susquehanna (Article/September 2016)
During his 36 years with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, John Arway has repeatedly faced off against those he sees threatening the state’s waterways. Once, he said, a coal miner attacked him across a boardroom table. Another time, a gas driller tried to run over him with a backhoe. Through it all, the mild-mannered biologist persevered, using the facts and his...
Shad restoration efforts around the Bay a mixed bag in 2019 (Article/September 2019)
A year ago, Pennsylvania’s shad hatchery — the largest in the Chesapeake Bay watershed — was spared the budget-cutting ax. But it still took a toll on American shad stocking efforts on the Susquehanna River. The state’s Van Dyke Research Station released just 830,000 shad larvae into the Bay’s largest tributary this year, the smallest number in the hatchery’s 43-year...
New York releases American shad larvae on Susquehanna (Article/July 2002)
For the first time in 172 years, American shad returned to the Susquehanna River’s headwaters in New York this spring. They didn’t come by river: The larvae came by truck from a Pennsylvania hatchery. Nonetheless, biologists hope the 250,000 larvae released this spring will remember where they came from after they migrate to the Atlantic Ocean this fall, then swim...
Scientists scrutinize virus, contaminants in smallmouth bass die-off (Article/July 2018)
For more than a decade, biologists have been picking away at a mystery: What caused a years-long decline of smallmouth bass in Pennsylvania’s Susquehanna River starting more than a decade ago? Some think they may have finally cracked the case. The results of recently published research, lauded by some as “the smoking gun,” points to a virus once thought not to affect...
Back from the Brink (Article/July 2003)
Barely a decade ago, some scientists began to think the unthinkable: American shad, which once had reigned as the Bay’s most valuable species, should be listed as an endangered species. In 1980, only 139 shad were counted at Conowingo Dam, on the Susquehanna River, once home to the largest spawning grounds on the entire East Coast. In 1992, biologists looking for...
Long slog ahead for new attempt to move shad past Conowingo, other dams (Article/June 2016)
Leon Senft remembers a time when he and other fishermen lined the shore of the Susquehanna River below the Conowingo Dam and hooked American shad almost as fast as they could cast their lines in the churning water. “We really had a bonanza there for a while,” recalled Senft, 85, who’s been angling for the big migratory fish longer than most people are alive. “It was not...
Pennsylvania declares Susquehanna stretch impaired for recreation (/August 2016)
Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection has proposed listing four miles of the 400-mile Susquehanna River as impaired for recreation. But though the river’s smallmouth bass have shown signs of illness and the populations have declined, the agency maintains it lacks the information to determine the river impaired for aquatic life. The DEP announced the...
Eels returning to Susquehanna; will mussels, water quality follow? (Article/November 2016)
Wearing a battery-powered electro-shocker on his back, Josh Newhard came up short as he waded knee-deep in Buffalo Creek to probe for any eels lurking under rocks or along its banks. “Well, that’s something we haven’t seen before,” he said. Just ahead, a herd of cows standing in the central Pennsylvania creek stared back at Newhard and the other five U.S. Fish and...
Sojourns help to create the next wave of our waters keepers (Message from the Alliance/August 2012)
A few weeks ago, one of our past “sojourn babies,” Kevin Rudisill, called our office to ask if I would discuss the Chesapeake Bay at an eighth-grade Earth Day assembly. I told him I’d be honored. I hadn’t seen Kevin since the Alliance organized its last Susquehanna Sojourn in 2009. Then, he was an adorable, active boy with chubby cheeks who liked to hang out with the...
Paddle into Pennsylvania’s past on West Branch water trail (Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network/July 2005)
Floating down the river, there was no sign of civilization. Rolling hills could be seen all around, but there were no houses. Hawks flew overhead and an Eastern wood-pewee sang in the forest. But there were no planes. The rushing sound of the river filled the air. But there were no roads, trucks or cars nearby. There was no cell phone coverage. It was as close to wilderness...

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