Bay Journal

Kathy Reshetiloff

You know spring is around the corner when…

Although the vernal equinox — the official first day of spring — occurs on March 20, changes in our natural world are already heralding the end of winter. These changes are erupting on the land, in the sky and in waterways, as quiet, gray days begin to burst with color and song.

Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay’s frigid winter waters

Loons are the submarines of the bird world. Webbed feet gracefully propel this bird underwater, giving the impression of submerged flight, as the loon stalks its prey. Diving, sometimes as deep as 200 feet, the loon snatches a fish in its dagger-like bill and returns to the surface to eat.

With their sleek bodies, thick necks and short tails, loons float low in the water and can...

Wildlife watching continues to lure Americans outdoors

Even as our society continues to depend more on technology for everyday activities and recreation, our love of nature and connection with the outdoors continues to be an integral part of our identity as Americans.

This passion for wildlife and wild places is reflected in the preliminary findings of the 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation....

Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek

This spring, a pair of ospreys returned to a webcam nesting platform in Baltimore’s Masonville Cove.

The ospreys, named Frederick and Harriet by osprey cam followers, are determined birds. In 2016, a pair of Canada geese took over their nest. Although Frederick and Harriet built a nest at another platform and laid eggs, unusually cold wet weather in May caused them to abandon...

We must protect bats as if our lives rely on each other, because they do

With Halloween quickly approaching, images of bats are appearing everywhere. It’s a good time to take a look at one of the most incredible animals on this planet.

No other animal compares to the Earth’s only flying mammal. Like all mammals, bats have hair and their young are born live and feed on milk. But unlike other mammals, the fingers in a bat’s hand are elongated and...

By the time it looks like autumn to us, Bay wildlife is already on the move

With warm days still hanging on, it’s hard to remember that summer is waning. Though it may not be that obvious, September is a month of change. Autumn doesn’t officially start until Sept. 21, but nature is already preparing for it, transforming and migrating.

In the forests, trees and other plants are beginning to alter their physiology. Some trees have already begun to change...

Frightful yet delightful; ghostly nettles haunt Chesapeake waters

Chesapeake summers. They’re hot and humid. We are drawn to the Chesapeake Bay and its many rivers for a cooling dip.

Whether you are along a beach, dock or on a boat, there is that one animal that makes you leery of entering the water. But this intimidating creature is not a shark. The animal that rules Chesapeake Bay summer waters is the simple sea nettle.


Take a pollinator to lunch: Plant a native garden

June is packed with opportunities to interact with wildlife and the outdoors. But can you imagine what the outdoors would be like without pollinators?

Pollinators — bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles are nearly as important as sunlight, soil and water to the reproductive success of more than 75 percent of the world’s flowering plants.


Wood ducks add splash of color to Chesapeake’s riverine forests

For many Chesapeake Bay watershed residents, mallards and resident Canada geese are the most common waterfowl encountered. These two species are also quite comfortable around people so they get close enough to be easily identified.

But, explore forests near rivers, streams and ponds during the warmer months and you’ll likely come across one of the most beautiful ducks in North...

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About Kathy Reshetiloff

Kathy Reshetiloff's avatar

Kathryn Reshetiloff is with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Chesapeake Bay Field Office in Annapolis.


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