Bay Journal

Halting this foreign invasion begins in your garden

We’re being invaded, but there are no armies, no soldiers. This is a green invasion. The culprits are aggressive, nonnative plant species that are silently taking over vast expanses of natural areas, wreaking havoc on local ecosystems....

A word to the wise about Chesapeake's owls

I’ve always loved the cool, crisp nights of autumn. The sky looks darker, the stars brighter. In general, autumn nights are quieter. The constant chirping of summer insects has been silenced by dropping temperatures. If you’re lucky,...

It's autumn and change is in the air … and sea

With all of the cookouts and crab feasts, it’s hard to imagine that summer is waning. Autumn doesn’t officially start until Sept. 21, but nature is already preparing for the metamorphosis.Trees and other plants are beginning to alter...

Join the hunt and learn the splender of Bay grasses

Each year, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service coordinates the SAV Hunt, a citizen effort to locate Chesapeake Bay grass beds. These grasses, known as submerged aquatic vegetation or SAV, are an important indicator of water quality and...

Without our help, birds will lose home tweet home

Thanks to the springlike temperatures, I've begun sleeping with my windows open. Each morning, I am awakened by the boisterous songs of birds returning  from their winter homes in the tropics. More than 360 species of birds make this...

BayScaping: going the whole yard to help the Bay

Now that spring has sprung, our attention turns toward our yards. Today, few of us have the time or resources needed to maintain a formal landscape. As a result, people are exploring alternatives to traditional landscapes, and many have...

Forested waterways have it made in the shade

I learned a lot about streams and rivers the summer of 1983 when I was a summer intern analyzing water samples throughout Maryland. I spent most of my days bent over a petri dish, trying to identify and catalog the aquatic animals in each...

Turkey vultures: nature's sanitary engineers

Turkey vultures. They're hard to admire. After all, they eat carrion, defend their nests by regurgitating and excrete on themselves. Still, they perform an important, yet thankless, function. Turkey vultures help to rid the landscape of road...

Wintering canvasbacks increasing on Bay waters

Continuing an ancient ritual, the majestic canvasback duck is returning to spend another winter on the Chesapeake Bay. The canvasback is easily recognized by its distinctive coloration and wedge-shaped head and bill profile. Male canvasbacks...

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