Birds are often music to our ears long before they are a sight to behold.

Bird sounds are broken down into two categories: calls and songs. Calls are short notes used to sound an alarm or to communicate routine information between bird parents and their children. Songs, on the other hand — or wing in this case — are a series of notes repeated in a sequence that forms a recognizable rhythm or phrase. Songs are used to signal territories or attract mates, or like a call, to sound an alarm. Occasionally, we humans cannot determine the purpose for a song, and it is thought that it might simply be a release of energy.

Each species has its own distinctive song[s] and call[s], which help us to identify those birds, especially when they are out of sight.

Below is a list songbirds found in the Bay watershed Can you name their tune?

1. Black-Capped Chickadee

2. Cardinal

3. Catbird

4. Common Crow

5. Eastern Bluebird

6. Eastern Meadowlark

7. Eastern Phoebe

8. Eastern Wood-Pewee

9. Ovenbird

10. Red-Winged Blackbird

11. Rufous-Sided Towhee

12. Scarlet Tanager

13. Summer Tanager

14. Tufted Titmouse

15. Veery

A. SEE-YOU-SEE-YEER [song]

B. PEE-A-WEE [song]

C. CHEER-CHEER [call]

D. TUREE [call]

E. WHEW [call]

F. CHICK-A-DEE-DEE [call]

G. MEOW [song, when not imitating another species]

H. CAW CAW [call]

I. TEACHER-TEACHER [song]

J. FEE-BEE [song]

K. CHIP-BURR [song]

L. DRINK YOUR TEA [song]

M. PETER-PETER [song]

N. PIT-TUCKY-TUCK [call]

O. KONK-A-REE [song]

Answers

1-F, 2-C, 3-G, 4-H, 5-D, 6-A, 7-J, 8-B, 9-I, 10-O, 11-L, 12-K 13-N, 14-M, 15-E