Bay Journal

Topics: Fisheries

Key to stream restoration success: location, location, location

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With millions of dollars being poured into urban and suburban stream restoration projects across the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a recent study suggests location matters when trying to assess how effective those efforts have been.

After surveying 13 Baltimore highly degraded suburban streams that had undergone makeovers, a pair of researchers found that aquatic insect populations were larger and more diverse in isolated headwaters than in larger downstream reaches.

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Getting steamed over faux Maryland crabs

Nothing says Maryland quite like a steamed crab smothered in Old Bay and slapped on a long picnic table. But sometimes, unsuspecting diners paying close to a day’s pay for the privilege of eating local bounty may actually be enjoying...

Oyster season opens on a down note (Blog)

The public oyster harvest season began Monday, with Chesapeake Bay watermen no doubt hoping for a better haul this fall and winter than last. For Maryland watermen, though, there isn’t a lot of room for optimism. Despite mild weather...

Scientists on the trail of a soft-crab killer

Patient Number 133 looked sturdy. Male. Blue. Admitted with all limbs. On a warm July afternoon in a makeshift phlebotomy lab on Maryland's Tilghman Island, molecular biologist Eric Schott pressed a needle into 133’s squirming...

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About Fisheries

Acre for acre, the Chesapeake Bay is one of the most productive water bodies on the planet when it comes to fish. Populations of the native striped bass and nonnative blue catfish have risen dramatically in recent decades, while blue crabs appear to be on the road to recovery.

Recent interest in aquaculture has sharply increased commercial production of oysters from the Chesapeake. Nonetheless, problems such as historic overfishing, habitat loss and disease have reduced the abundance of some iconic species such as wild oyster populations, American shad and river herring, American eels and Atlantic sturgeon to near record-low levels. In the headwaters, brook trout have suffered major habitat losses.

Ecotone
Waterfowl Festival 2017
Chesapeake Film Festival
Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017
Valliant and Associates
Fall Honeybee
EQR: Environmental Quality Resources
High Tide in Dorchester

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