Bay Journal

Tim Rowland

Industry-influenced research: a new level of caveat emptor

With justification, Americans are traditionally proud of their lawns and gardens. And this is nothing new. When George Washington was fighting the war for our independence, his mind often wandered to his beloved grounds of Mount Vernon, and he tried his best, with a constant stream of letters, to tend his grounds from afar.

Solar energy, like a phoenix, rising from the ashes of coal industry

In 1882, the Prospect House, a sprawling lodge overlooking a remote lake in New York’s Adirondack Mountains, became the first hotel in the world to have electric lights in every room. Last month, a Quality Inn overlooking the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers became the first hotel in West Virginia to be powered by electricity drawn from the sun.

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Sunrise in West Virginia

In 1882, the Prospect House, a sprawling lodge overlooking a remote lake in New York’s Adirondack Mountains, became the first hotel in the world to have electric lights in every room. Last month, a Quality Inn overlooking the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers became the first hotel in West Virginia to be powered by electricity drawn from the sun.

Each circumstance...

Can the outrage; open when needed

We’re taught the virtue of allowing cooler heads to prevail, but at times it might be wished that anger were preser vable. That it could be canned, dried or frozen to be reconstituted when needed. Perhaps then, the passion we feel with each passing environmental disaster could be recreated when it came time for Congress to write new laws designed to prevent similar disasters.

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Unsung volunteers take up the causes of babbling brooks

Warm Springs Run begins in a logged-over marsh near a trucking terminal in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. Eleven miles later it empties into the Potomac River, 170 miles northwest of the Chesapeake Bay. The creek, hardly more than a dozen feet wide, will inspire no poets, and it supports no canoeists or fishermen to champion its cause.

Through its brief existence from...

Effort to regulate wood smoke kindles slow burn

The Environmental Protection Agency’s beef with fossil fuels is well documented, so up until now, the 10 percent of Americans who heat their homes with wood might have felt as if they were doing something noble by declaring their independence from coal, oil and gas.

Then last month, the agency informed wood-burners that they are part of the problem, not part of the solution,...

Unsung volunteers take up the causes of babbling brooks

Warm Springs Run begins in a logged-over marsh near a trucking terminal in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. Eleven miles later it empties into the Potomac River, 170 miles northwest of the Chesapeake Bay. The creek, hardly more than a dozen feet wide, will inspire no poets, and it supports no canoeists or fishermen to champion its cause.

Through its brief existence from...

Studying fracking to death may give Maryland’s environment valuable protections

Two years ago, a real estate listing for a choice parcel of property in the Allegheny Mountains pointed out a dichotomy that’s almost as old as the hills themselves.

“...(T)he property is home to several black bear, bobcats, squirrels, turkeys, and whitetail deer. It is also located within Marcellus and Utica Shale areas...providing a great investment opportunity,” the ad read....

Rural broadband may be environmental boon

Rural broadband access may encourage clean industry and bring new thinking to rural areas, giving residents more opportunity to improve the health of their woods, fields and streams, writes Tim Rowland.

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About Tim Rowland

Tim Rowland is a newspaper columnist and author of “Maryland’s Appalachian Highlands: Massacres, Moonshine and Mountaineering.”

 

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