Bay Journal

Cindy Ross

Seeing sometimes best way to understanding

Sometimes seeing is the clearest path to understanding, and that’s what it took for an Amish farmer to understand the connection between his Lancaster County, PA, dairy and the Chesapeake Bay, writes Cindy Ross. Ross writes from Pennsylvania.

Warriors Walking Off the War

Around the campfire, the veterans talked of exploding bombs, needing to scrape up guts with a shovel, and picking up dismembered limbs after a suicide bomber drove his dump truck into the Marines post. They talked about the kind of stuff that kills best buddies and, afterwards, puts survivors on a dozen different meds.

The kind of stuff that makes them forever vigilant ; they...

Otters: the furry brown canary in Bay watershed’s streams

I am tramping around the Pocono Mountains in the upper reaches of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay watershed with retired Pennsylvania Game Commission officer Barry Warner. After 25 years of working these lands, he knows where the otters hang out.

We walk through tall grasses and highbush blueberries, stepping gingerly as we look for otter, otter sign and otter...

Spying on otters to protect clean streams

I am tramping around the Pocono Mountains in the upper reaches of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay watershed with retired Pennsylvania Game Commission officer Barry Warner. After twenty-five years working these lands, he knows where the otters hang out.

We walk through tall grasses and high bush blueberries, stepping gingerly as we look for otter, otter sign and...

Place nature in their paths and kids will learn

We will all need something to think about when we finally retreat to the rocking chair, and it better not be regretting the life we did not live, writes Cindy Ross. She suggests that adults are not immune from nature deficit disorder, and prescribes a night paddle. Ross writes from Pennsylvania.

Take a moonlit paddle to cure nature deficit disorder

We will all need something to think about when we finally retreat to the rocking chair, and it better not be regretting the life we did not live, writes Cindy Ross. She suggests that adults are not immune from nature deficit disorder, and prescribes a night paddle. Ross writes from Pennsylvania.

The art of turning trash to treasure

Entrepreneurs in Lancaster, PA, showed author Cindy Ross artful ways to turn old materials headed for the dump into stylish, useful products, a practice that conserves resources. Ross suggests we could all follow their lead. She writes from Pennsylvania.

Whooping Crane’s slow return shows dangers of habitat loss

In 1941 only about 20 Whooping Cranes remained alive, their numbers greatly reduced by loss of habitat and hunting. Now, after decades of work, the numbers worldwide have slowly increased, writes Cindy Ross. There are 400 endangered species in the United States, and Ross suggests that it would be wiser to protect habitat before more plants and animals

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About Cindy Ross

Cindy Ross's avatar

Cindy Ross lives in Pennsylvania and unlike some children today, has a hard time coming indoors. She has written six books about it; her latest, from McGraw-Hill, is “Scraping Heaven: A Family’s Journey Along the Continental Divide.” She fears she has inflicted her children with the same addiction to fun in the outdoors.

 

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