Bay Journal

Dave Harp is a photographer living in Cambridge, MD, who specializes in capturing images of the Chesapeake Bay.

Mapping the Choptank and its many uses

  • January 08, 2014
Maryland Department of Natural Resources fisheries expert Jim Uphoff uses a special electronic stylus to mark a map of the Choptank River. The photo was taken during the two-day Choptank River Recreational Use Mapping Workshop at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills. (Dave Harp)

A diverse group of river users — including DNR employees, outfitters, charter boat operators, wildlife observers, and tourism experts — convened recently to determine how, when, and where people use the Choptank River. Motorized and sail boating, fishing and crabbing, paddling, wildlife viewing and guided services were among the activities covered during the two-day Choptank River Recreational Use Mapping Workshop at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills. The result of this work will be a map of the river that will  inform DNR planners and decision makers about public access, land acquisition and recreation.

The information will be added to an online portal that illustrates the resources and human uses of Chesapeake Bay, which you can view here.

 

 

 

 

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About David Harp

Dave Harp is a photographer living in Cambridge, MD, who specializes in capturing images of the Chesapeake Bay.

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Comments

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Ginny Stibolt on January 13, 2014:

Back in the early 70s I spent a lot of time on the Choptank as I was studying and mapping the population of seaside alder (Alnus maritima) as part of my masters degree in Plant Taxonomy at the University of Maryland. It's range is limited to a diagonal swath across the Delmarva Peninsula and then again along the Red River in Texas and Oklahoma. Unlike other alders, such as the much more abundant smooth alder (A. serrulata), it blooms in the fall, not the spring. When the two species coexist, the seaside alder is usually farther out in the water. Last time I was out there, several years ago, I could still see some of the seaside alders, but since the range is so limited, I would hope that this plant is being considered in future plans for the river.


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