Bay Journal

Chesapeake Notebook

News, notes and observations from the Bay Journal staff.

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New report finds ample oyster growth on restored Eastern Shore reefs

With the Hogan administration still on the fence about resuming federally funded oyster reef restoration in Maryland’s Tred Avon River, a new report says large-scale restoration work completed on a nearby Eastern Shore waterway is doing well so far.

The report, released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, concludes that a dozen restored oyster reefs checked last fall in Harris Creek show “healthy restoration,” despite indications some of its oysters have been poached.

 

Timothy B. Wheeler
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Study: Sea level rise poses threat to military bases in Bay

The giant Naval Station Norfolk and other military facilities on the Chesapeake Bay have long been prepared for defense, but now face a threat unlike any seen before: sea level rise of as much as seven feet by 2100.

A new Union of Concerned Scientists study evaluated the risks of climate-induced inundation at a sample of 18 military bases on the East and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Five are in the Bay’s tidal regions.

Naval Station Norfolk, the largest such base in the world, faces not only rising seas but subsiding land. A nearby air and army installation, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, is also slowly sinking.

Jeff Day
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West Coast fish pathogen found in Maryland stream

A fish pathogen previously seen in this country only in Pacific salmon and trout has turned up in a Maryland stream in yet another species of fish. The finding, by researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey, poses a potential new aquatic health threat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

Scientists surveying fish in Catoctin Mountain Park near Thurmont last year found the pathogen, Dermocystidium, in cysts on the bodies of Blue Ridge sculpin, a freshwater fish that favors rocky riffles in creeks and headwaters, according to Vicki Blazer, USGS research fish biologist and lead study author. The finding was published online Tuesday in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health.

Timothy B. Wheeler

Picture This

Tips from veteran Chesapeake Bay photographer Dave Harp about how to capture the perfect images from your outdoor travels.

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Pond paddle provides lovely setting for photos

I always try to get out and make some photos on the solstices and equinoxes,  and an assignment to illustrate a story about Trap Pond allowed me to chase the morning light there a few hours after this year’s Autumnal equinox.   It’s an amazingly beautiful patch of wild Delaware near Laurel and will be featured in the November issue of the Bay Journal.   The pond, created in the 18th century to power a saw mill to convert the trees into board feet of lumber,  is the epicenter of the northern most stand of bald cypress trees in the United States.   The relatively young trees in the middle of the pond were planted in the 1930’s when the water level  was drawn down to allow the trees to grow.    Once they’re heads are above the water they seem to do fine in an aquatic environment.  Be sure to look for a more complete story about Trap Pond State Park by Tom Horton in the November issue of the Bay Journal.

David Harp
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Want to take some really cool photos?

Bundle up and take advantage of the opportunities for great photos provided the the crisp air, and low angle of sunlight, during winter months.

David Harp
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Photographers’ reliable “standby”

While cameras have changed much over the past century, one ingredient of good photos has remained largely the same — the tripod.

David Harp

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