Bay Journal

Chesapeake Notebook

News, notes and observations from the Bay Journal staff.

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MD septic pollution lawsuit cleared for trial

A Caroline County judge has ruled that a former Maryland woman who sued the state and the Eastern Shore town of Goldsboro, blaming them for the loss of her family campground to unchecked septic pollution, will have her day in court.

In early September, Circuit Court Judge Sidney Campen denied a motion by the town and the state to dismiss the case, saying that a jury needed to decide if either bore responsibility for the pollution to Lake Bonnie, a 28-acre impoundment on the 100-acre property that Gail Litz used to own.  The judge has yet to set a trial date.

Rona Kobell
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VA forum to bring Bay issues into governor's race

Virginia voters will get to hear this week where the state’s gubernatorial hopefuls  stand on the Chesapeake Bay and other water quality  issues, as a pair of environmental groups stage a candidates’  forum in Richmond.

The Clean Water Forum, co-hosted by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the James River Association, will begin at 12:30 p.m. on Sept. 6 at The National Theater in the state capital.

Whitney Pipkin
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Once lowly soft-shell crab new darling of haute cuisine

Time was, seaside restaurants would put out a simple handwritten sign, usually around Memorial Day. It would say, “we have soft crabs,” and diners would line up for the fried favorite, served between two pieces of white bread.

Nowadays, the sign would have to stay up much of the year. Thanks to increased demand, better shipping methods, a changing global palette and a drive for artisanal and local food items, the proverbial “bug on a bun” has been elevated to a place on top of salads, small plates and platters — and even cooking shows.

“It’s just getting unbelievable,” said Terry Vincent, owner of Lindy’s Seafood, a Hooper’s Island wholesaler that sells crabs from the Chesapeake Bay as well as from Florida, Georgia and North Carolina.

Rona Kobell

Picture This

Tips from veteran Chesapeake Bay photographer Dave Harp about how to capture the perfect images from your outdoor travels.

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Pond paddle provides lovely setting for photos

I always try to get out and make some photos on the solstices and equinoxes,  and an assignment to illustrate a story about Trap Pond allowed me to chase the morning light there a few hours after this year’s Autumnal equinox.   It’s an amazingly beautiful patch of wild Delaware near Laurel and will be featured in the November issue of the Bay Journal.   The pond, created in the 18th century to power a saw mill to convert the trees into board feet of lumber,  is the epicenter of the northern most stand of bald cypress trees in the United States.   The relatively young trees in the middle of the pond were planted in the 1930’s when the water level  was drawn down to allow the trees to grow.    Once they’re heads are above the water they seem to do fine in an aquatic environment.  Be sure to look for a more complete story about Trap Pond State Park by Tom Horton in the November issue of the Bay Journal.

David Harp
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Want to take some really cool photos?

Bundle up and take advantage of the opportunities for great photos provided the the crisp air, and low angle of sunlight, during winter months.

David Harp
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Photographers’ reliable “standby”

While cameras have changed much over the past century, one ingredient of good photos has remained largely the same — the tripod.

David Harp

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