Bay Journal

Chesapeake Notebook

News, notes and observations from the Bay Journal staff.

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Cardin sees fights ahead in DC to protect Bay cleanup progress

Warning that the Chesapeake Bay is at risk, U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin asked environmental groups to help him fend off moves expected by the incoming Trump administration and the next Congress that he warned could undermine the long-running efforts to restore the nation’s largest estuary.

Cardin, a Maryland Democrat who has long been active with environmental issues, met at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation offices in Annapolis Monday with leaders from state conservation groups to preview likely efforts to shift federal policy in the coming year. He counseled them to enlist local and state officials around the Bay watershed, including Republicans, to communicate to leaders in Washington that the Chesapeake restoration effort Is working and needs to continue.

Timothy B. Wheeler
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Blackwater refuge expands to deal with rising water

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, already vast at 27,000 acres, is becoming even larger.

The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service announced Thursday that it has acquired 410 acres of new land for the refuge on Maryland’s Eastern Shore from The Nature Conservancy.

Rona Kobell
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Dead manatee found in Baltimore harbor

A dead female manatee turned up last week in Baltimore’s harbor, and state officials said the cause of its death remains undetermined.

A citizen called the Maryland Department of Natural Resources on Nov. 21 to report the deceased marine mammal. It took two days, and the help of staff at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, to recover the manatee because it was in an “inaccessible location,’’ according to Amanda Weschler, the DNR’s marine mammal and sea turtle stranding coordinator.

Timothy B. Wheeler

Picture This

Tips from veteran Chesapeake Bay photographer Dave Harp about how to capture the perfect images from your outdoor travels.

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Pond paddle provides lovely setting for photos

I always try to get out and make some photos on the solstices and equinoxes,  and an assignment to illustrate a story about Trap Pond allowed me to chase the morning light there a few hours after this year’s Autumnal equinox.   It’s an amazingly beautiful patch of wild Delaware near Laurel and will be featured in the November issue of the Bay Journal.   The pond, created in the 18th century to power a saw mill to convert the trees into board feet of lumber,  is the epicenter of the northern most stand of bald cypress trees in the United States.   The relatively young trees in the middle of the pond were planted in the 1930’s when the water level  was drawn down to allow the trees to grow.    Once they’re heads are above the water they seem to do fine in an aquatic environment.  Be sure to look for a more complete story about Trap Pond State Park by Tom Horton in the November issue of the Bay Journal.

David Harp
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Want to take some really cool photos?

Bundle up and take advantage of the opportunities for great photos provided the the crisp air, and low angle of sunlight, during winter months.

David Harp
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Photographers’ reliable “standby”

While cameras have changed much over the past century, one ingredient of good photos has remained largely the same — the tripod.

David Harp

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